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CHATEAU DE WINTRANGE


Rustic event venue with secret garden

charm in the Moselle wine region. 

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CHATEAU DE WINTRANGE


Rustic event venue with secret garden

charm in the Moselle wine region. 

A PREMIERE VENUE

Established in 1610, Château de Wintrange is the perfect destination for your most important events. From elegant, rustic weddings to upscale, yet casual corporate events and family celebrations, Château de Wintrange provides a truly memorable experience for you and your guests.

Come and explore this magnificent and magical setting.  Stroll through our three acres of gardens with towering cedars, rows of blossoming fruit trees and an abundance of naturally manicured beauty. Let the park be your playground for family gatherings or corporate events.

The glassed Orangerie in the courtyard welcomes your guests for a dinner, wine tastings of our local vintages or provides a perfect backdrop for an unforgettable cocktail reception.

Unique and versatile, Château de Wintrange will bring your imagination to life and transform any event into a magical and very memorable celebration.

Located in Moselle wine country on the south-eastern tip of Luxembourg, Wintrange is a small village surrounded by vineyards, lakes and a bird sanctuary. Nested in the village center, Château de Wintrange is a short 30 minute drive from Luxembourg city and LUX airport.

The Château de Wintrange property is undergoing exciting renovations and remodelling to expand our event hosting services for 2017, including the addition of Guest Rooms to extend and savour your Château experience.

More about the History.

The rustic Orangerie, located in the courtyard of Château de Wintrange.

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OUR STORY


Château de Wintrange has been in the caring hands of the Schlesser family since 1938.

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OUR STORY


Château de Wintrange has been in the caring hands of the Schlesser family since 1938.

Located in the picturesque Mosel river valley, Château de Wintrange is the historic monument of the village of Wintrange.

Named as one of the most beautiful privately owned castles in the Luxembourg region in Hémecht,  Château de Wintrange carries a long history of Nobles and Lords and simple people who were lucky enough to be the temporary guardians of this Renaissance gem.

Built in 1610 by Alexandre de Musset, Sire of Foetz, it has changed family ownership 18 times.

The village name “Wintrange” was first documented in writings in 987 AD, although the area has been inhabited for several millennia. The Romans were the first to cultivate vineyards in the fertile soil of the Mosel Valley. Remains of Roman villas have been excavated in the area.

The castle was built with its own well system, waterways, a walled park and own vineyards. The surrounding property was much larger in the 1600s than today, then being tended by servants.

The main building structure with its four towers hasn’t changed in the past four centuries.  In the 30-year war (1618-1648) some fortifications were added, as well as a gunport to protect the main entrance.

In the 18th century, the annexed barn with the 5th tower was built as an interconnected extension.  It was mainly used a horse stable.

In the 1930’s, iron ore mining industrial Nick Schlesser hunted game in the lush forests above the village and fell in love with this little jewel of a castle in the valley. Previously owned by Gisbert de Witt, who cultivated the park into an orchard, the Château de Wintrange was sold in 1938 by Notary Champagne to Nicolas Schlesser.

Today, Château de Wintrange is still privately owned and carefully restored by Nick's grandson Philippe Schlesser and his family.

The castle and park are still the Schlesser family’s private residence and can be rented for events, weddings, film and photo shoots. 


Nick Schlesser (driver) having fun with friends in his Hansa automobile in 1917. 

Nick Schlesser was an industrious man. Born and raised in Rumelange, one of Luxembourg's iron ore mining towns, he grew up working in the mining industry. The family business, a hunting equipment store and restaurant, was a husband & wife operation. Nick went hunting, and his wife prepared the hunted game in the restaurant, appropriately named 'Juegdstuff' (Hunting lounge).

As the mining business slowed down in the early 1940's, the Schlesser family shifted focus to the Château’s orchard and started selling their fruit in various épiceries in Luxembourg city. A distillery was opened on the castle grounds to distill ripe fruit and make some delicious fruit Schnapps.

But nothing lasts forever.  WWII shattered Europe.  Nick suffered a stroke after returning to a ruin after being evacuated from the property during the war.  As Nick was paralyzed and was confined to a wheelchair, his son Henri Schlesser took over the operations with his mother in 1942 at the age of 13. Nicolas Schlesser passed away in 1952 succumbing to another stroke, at the age of 57. Henri kept the promise he gave his father on his dying bed, to keep the castle in the family, protect and restore it to its original beauty.

Henri, who liked to be called 'Hank' in English, and 'Heng' in Luxembourgish, worked in the construction business, and spent all of his spare time fixing the castle throughout his lifetime. Villagers always said that he wasn't married to his wife, but to the castle - which seemed appropriate, looking at the amount of time he spent on ladders renovating and restoring the family property. This castle was his life, and his life's work. Henri passed away at the age of 81 in December of 2010.

His son Philippe Schlesser, who studied Industrial Design in Denmark and Canada, took over the family heritage, and has started redesigning the property to make it more publicly accessible. After decades of the gates being closed to the public, Philippe plans to use the space for community and cultural events.

In order to finance the ongoing renovations and restorations of such a National Historic Monument, the castle lends itself as a venue for weddings, private and corporate events.

Being a product designer, Philippe Schlesser has created a designer label based around the family property. The brand, called Chatwin, carries a line of unique kitchen and household products, designed in the spirit of the Château aesthetic and heirloom qualities. The name is derived from the Chateau de Wintrange , as well as one of his favourite travel writers Bruce Chatwin. When Philippe isn't working around the castle or designing Chatwin products, he spends a good amount of time doing humanitarian work in developing countries with his organization DesignAID.

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RENOVATIONS


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RENOVATIONS


National HeritAge 

WE are only Temporary guardians of a National Historic Monument

Owning and operating a château that has become a national historic monument means that it's a job that never ends, a labor of love and filled with passion and a sentimental value from our family past and heritage. We try to respect the decisions taken by every previous owner and identify their era, style, taste and vision. Château de Wintrange has a few signature Renaissance details in the building structure, like the diamond shaped stairway windows facing the courtyard. Rather than adding yet another layer of our own taste, we chose to bring out the best of each era. This castle has been evolving over centuries, and has grown in size with additional buildings. Each component has been built according to current techniques, technology and available materials, and can be identified as such. In 2014 we started a collaboration with the National Service for Sites and Monuments in Luxembourg to restore the building to its full glory.  Future plans include adding an event space on the property, with the goal of enhancing public use of the space and generating an income to financially support the maintenance and beautification of the property. 

In 1938, our grandfather Nicolas Schlesser purchased the château as a run down property at an auction. He restored and rebuilt the building and planted and orchard, selling fruit in Luxembourg city and distilling fruit schnapps, like prune, strawberry, mirabelle, pear, raspberry and other wonderful fruit distillates. We still have a fine collection of grandpa's great bottles down to 1942.

When WWII broke out and our family was evacuated, German soldiers occupied the chateau for 11 months. It was a cold winter, and any wooden furniture and flooring ended up as firewood. Soldiers were freezing, and tried to make ends meet. The château suffered, but structurally survived.

 A year later, our family returned to find the château in pieces. The US Army occupied the château soon after, and our family was once again evacuated for nine months. The military left a devastated château and family. Nick Schlesser had a stroke upon his return to the new ruin, and spend the next nine years paralyzed in a wheelchair before a second stoke ended his life in 1952.

His son, Henri Schlesser, then 23 years old took over the renovation and made it his life's work. On his father's deathbed, he promised to never sell the château and to rebuild it to its original glory. A promise he held, and a price he paid. 'He was married to his castle' people still say in the small village of Wintrange. It was true, Henri truly gave his life, time and money to keeping the promise. With age, Henri couldn't work as much anymore, but was too stubborn to pass it on to the next generation. Over the next fifteen years, the castle lay empty and alone, slowly degrading once again. In 2003, Henri's son Philippe pushed ahead to get the roof fixed and completely re-shingled with slate. This move saved the building from rain and decay. In 2010, Henri passed away at age 81 and left the castle to his son Philippe. Being an industrial designer and working in the field of design and architecture, the slow development and renovations of the château could begin under the watchful eye for detail.

Currently, the castle is being redrawn and renovated by Philippe's friend and work partner Jean-Paul Carvalho, who operates Carvalho Architects, and in collaboration with SSMN and the support from our village community and the people of the commune de Schengen.

Local workers taking a break from fixing the roof after WWII.

In the early 1974, Henri Schlesser cleaned up the stairway walls and discovered a inverted keyhole embrasure, as seen on the left the day it was opened up.

Proceeds from the rental of the château are used for renovations and upkeep of the property. We try to preserve this National Historical Monument, the heritage of our village and community.